SODA

Student Organization for Democratic Alternatives

SODA is a student group that is oriented towards the promotion, expansion and construction of democratic enterprises and institutions with worker cooperatives spearheading this undertaking. We are specifically for coordinated projects, activities etc. between us and other groups (on and off campus) so as to not only facilitate consciousness-raising in regards to democratic alternatives, but also lead to having a tangible positive affect on the lives of individuals. Working closely with the NYC Network of Worker Cooperatives, SODA has directed student energy at addressing policy issues in New York City relating to workplace democracy and workman's advocacy.

Join us in shaping the future of work.

SODA is a CUNY-based student group that seeks to promote democratic enterprises and institutions in New York City. SODA believes in the potential of worker cooperatives to democratize workplaces and participatory budgeting to democratize public finance and is active to support both of these up-and-coming movements. Working closely with the NYC Network of Worker Cooperatives, SODA has directed student energy at addressing policy issues in New York City relating to workplace democracy and workman's advocacy, in the belief that it is our goal not only to educate people on new ways of structuring workplaces and local governments, but to actually help people craft these new structures as to produce a concrete and positive impact on the communities with which we cooperate.

 

Join us in shaping the future of work.


A long era of economic stagnation could well lead to a profound national debate about an America that is dominated neither by giant corporations nor by socialist bureaucrats. It would be a fitting next direction for a troubled nation that has long styled itself as of, by and for the people.
— Gar Alperovitz: Professor of Political Economy, University of Maryland
If you happen to be looking for your morning coffee near Golden Gate Park and the bright red storefront of the Arizmendi Bakery attracts your attention, congratulations. You have found what the readers of The San Francisco Bay Guardian, a local alt-weekly, deem the city’s best bakery. But it has another, less obvious, distinction. Of the $3.50 you hand over for a latte (plus $2.75 for the signature sourdough croissant), not one penny ends up in the hands of a faraway investor. Nothing goes to anyone who might be tempted to sell out to a larger bakery chain or shutter the business if its quarterly sales lag.
— Shaila Dewen, New York Times Magazine
 
 
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Bringing the Co-op Issue to City Hall

See how we have taken action in supporting the burgeoning solidarity economy model in NYC through our support of the $1.2 million Worker Cooperative Business Development Initiative and discover ways you can get involved in the politics of workplace democracy here.

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Global Solutions to Local Problems

Workers' cooperatives may be a relatively new movement in the U.S., but many Latin American and European companies have been employing cooperative business strategies for decades. Check out some case studies and reading material on the living history of the cooperative here.

(C) 2014 by Student Organization for Democratic Alternatives under Creative Commons No Derivatives / No Attribution License